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Submission Guidelines for AREI contributors

 Submission Guidelines for AREI contributors: Journal for Central and Eastern European History and Politics

The editors of "AREI" consider for publication only original academic articles which have not been published in print or electronic form in any language and have not been simultaneously submitted to any other academic journal or publisher.

The acceptable length of texts submitted to the Editorial Team is:

for articles – up to 100,000 characters, including spaces and footnotes;

for reviews and reviews articles – up to 40,000 characters, including spaces and footnotes.

We encourage potential Authors to limit the volume of their papers to 40,000 characters in the case of academic articles, and to 20,000 characters in the case of reviews. We also ask potential reviewers to consult their proposals in advance with the Editorial Team.

When submitting a paper for publication in AREI journal, please make sure it fulfils the following basic requirements:

The text (preferably Times New Roman; font size 12) should start with the title and be followed by the Author’s full first and last name, academic affiliations, and, if applicable, his/her ORCID number;

In an asterisk footnote to the title, please insert acknowledgements, information about research funding, and potential conflicts of interest.

The abstract should be written in italic and should include the research questions, conclusions, as well as five to seven key words.

Literature quoted in the article and, if necessary, other texts should be listed at the end of the article as a bibliography.

All references should be placed in footnotes. We do not accept Harvard-style references.

Orthography of papers should follow British English rules and spelling.

 

AREI does not accept articles with more than three authors.

 

The house style of the АREI: Journal for Central and Eastern European History and Politics is based on the style guide of the Modern Humanities Research Association (MHRA), available to download at www.mhra.org.uk

I References (footnotes and main text)

References should be cited in footnotes. The first reference should be cited in full. Please do not use the Harvard author and date system: any ‘further reading’ to which you wish to draw readers’ attention should be mentioned at the relevant point in the text or footnotes; work you cite directly should be mentioned in footnotes and in the bibliography. Use the following styles both for footnoted references and for works directly cited in the main text, paying close attention to punctuation:

Books

Tom McArthur, Worlds of Reference: Lexicography, Learning and Language from the Clay Tablet to the Computer (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986), p. 59.

Jean Starobinski, Montaigne in Motion, trans. by Arthur Goldhammer (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986), p. 174.

Dictionary of the Middle Ages, ed. by Joseph R. Strayer and others, 13 vols (New York: Scribner, 1982–89), vi (1985), 26.

Carlos Fuentes, Aura, ed. by Peter Standish, Durham Modern Language Series: Hispanic Texts, 1 (Durham: University of Durham, 1986), pp. 12–16 (p. 14).

Boswell: The English Experiment 1785–1789, ed. by Irma S. Lustig and Frederick A. Pottle, The Yale Edition of the Private Papers of James Boswell (London: Heinemann; New York: McGraw Hill, 1986), pp. 333–37.

          Pay attention that the author’s name should only come first for monographs. For collections and editions, the title comes first.

         

b. Articles / chapters in books

Martin Elsky,Words, Things, and Names: Jonson's Poetry and Philosophical Grammar’, in Classic and Cavalier: Essays on Jonson and the Sons of Ben, ed. by Claude J. Summers and Ted-Larry Pebworth (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1982), pp. 31–55 (p. 41)

 

c. Articles in journals/periodicals

Richard Hillyer, In More than Name Only: JonsonsTo Sir Horace Vere”’, MLR, 85 (1990), 1–11.

Robert F. Cook, ‘Baudouin de Sebourc: un poème édifiant?’, Olifant, 14 (1989), 115–35 (pp. 118–19).

Issue numbers are required only where each issue starts at page 1.

d. Online sources

Graham Gibbs, review of Jonathan Israel, The Dutch Republic: Its Rise, Greatness and Fall, Oxford, 1997, Reviews in History, June 1997 <http://www.history.ac.uk/ reviews/review/30> [accessed 28 January 2000]

Please add DOI number, if applicable.

e. Archival sources

Minute by Pink, 25 December 1944, The National Archives, London, Foreign Office 371, 43989, R20647.

Stanisław August to Augustyn Deboli, 29 July 1789, AGAD, Warsaw, Zbiór Popielów, 414, fol. 387.

 

II Repeated references

Please give full the reference (as described above) for the first mention. You may use abbreviations for standard reference works (for example, PSB for Polski Słownik Biograficzny, ODNB for Oxford Dictionary of National Biography). You may use ibid. (note full stop, not italic) for a repeated reference which immediately follows a reference to the same work. In repeated references, the shortest intelligible form should be used. For clarity in repeated references, use the author’s surname and a shortened form of the title.

 

Do not include an ellipsis after the shortened title of a work which has been quoted previously.

Please use scientific transliteration of works published in languages using Cyrillic alphabets in accordance with the table of transliterations for specific languages published on the AREI website. We strongly encourage using software for automatic transliteration; this is available for all registered AREI users. Only in particularly justified cases, e.g., when a quoted work or source cannot be unanimously assigned to any modern Slavic language, use of the ISO 9:1995 system for transliteration is permitted.

 

a. Books

1st reference: Jarosław Czubaty, Zasada dwóch sumień: Normy postępowania i granice kompromisu politycznego Polaków w sytuacjach wyboru (1795–1815), Warsaw, 2005, p. 401.

Repeated reference: Czubaty, Zasada dwóch sumień, p. 25. 

 

A chapter in a book

1st reference: Robert Frost, Ordering the Kaleidoscope: The Construction of Identities in the Lands of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth since 1569, in Power and the Nation in European History, ed. Len Scales and Oliver Zimmer, Cambridge, 2005, pp. 212–31 (p. 215).

Repeated reference: Frost, Ordering the Kaleidoscope, p. 229. 

 

An article in journal

1st reference: Anna Grześkowiak-Krwawicz, Dyskusje o wolności słowa w czasach stanisławowskich, KH, 102, 1995, 1, pp. 53–65 (pp. 56–57).

Repeated reference: Grześkowiak-Krwawicz, Dyskusje o wolności słowa, p. 60. d.

b. Archival sources

1st reference: Minute by Pink, 25 December 1944, The National Archives (hereafter TNA), London, Foreign Office (hereafter FO) 371, 43989, R20647.

Repeated reference: Pink, 25 December 1944, TNA FO 371, 43989, R20647.

1st reference: Stanisław August to Augustyn Deboli, 29 July 1789, AGAD, Warsaw, Zbiór Popielów (hereafter ZP), 414, fol. 387.

Repeated reference: Stanisław August to Deboli, 12 August 1789, ZP 414, fol. 398.

If, in an article with a large number of footnotes, a reference is not repeated until well after its first mention, it may occasionally help the reader if you refer back to the original note: for example, Frost, ‘Ordering the Kaleidoscope’ (see note 7 above), p. 217

Non-English Titles

Titles of non-English periodicals should be italicized. There is no need to give a translation of the title: for example, Pravda, Gazeta Wyborcza.

Titles of books and other works discussed should be given in the original language, italicized, and (if in other alphabets) transliterated. A translation of the title and the date of original publication should appear in parentheses: for example ‘In Dostoevskiis Prestuplenie i nakazanie (Crime and Punishment, 1866), we find that…’. Thereafter, you may use either the original or translated title, but do so consistently.

Italics are used for the titles of all works individually published under their own titles: books, journals, plays, longer poems, pamphlets, and any other entire published works. However, titles such as ‘the Bible’, ‘the Koran’, and ‘the Talmud’ are printed in roman, as are titles of the books of the Bible.

Titles of series are not italicized, e.g., ‘Theory and History of Literature’.

The titles of chapters in books or of articles in books or journals should be in roman type enclosed within single quotation marks. The titles of poems, short stories, or essays which form part of a larger volume or other whole, or the first lines of poems used as titles, should also be given in roman type in single quotation marks.

Titles of films, substantial musical compositions, and works of art are italicized

Quotations

Short quotations should be enclosed in single quotation marks and run on with the main text. If a verse quotation includes a line division, this should be marked with a spaced upright stroke ( | ).

For a quotation within a quotation, double quotation marks should be used:

Mrs Grose replies that ‘Master Miles only said “We must do nothing but what she likes!”’.

If a short quotation is used at the end of a sentence, the final full stop should be outside the closing quotation mark:

Do not be afraid of what Stevenson calls ‘a little judicious levity’.

Always give sources (including page reference) of quotations. When omitting words from quotations, you should indicate this by means of three full stops within brackets: […].

Long quotations should be broken off by an increased space from the preceding and following lines of typescript. A long quotation should never be used in the middle of a sentence of the main text.

Long quotations should not be enclosed within quotation marks. A quotation occurring within such a long quotation should be in single quotation marks; if a further quotation occurs within that, double quotation marks should be used.

 

Non-English Words

Italicize non-English words (Untermensch, Szlachta) unless they are in common English usage (for example, elite, genre). The abbreviations ibid. and et al. (note full stop) are not italicized.

Words in Cyrillic, Greek, Arabic, Hebrew and so on should be italicized and transliterated (unless you are quoting a substantial passage, in which case it is best not to transliterate).

 

Capitals in all languages retain their accents.

Names of institutions and organizations are not italicized: for example, Sejm, Duma, Polska Akademia Nauk.

 

Numerals

Spell out numerals from one to ninety-nine and use figures for 100 and above (but keep ‘hundred’, ‘thousand’, ‘million’ and ‘billion’ as words if they appear as whole numbers: for example, ‘a thousand years ago’).

Use figures in percentages: 26 per cent.

For ranges, give the last two digits: for example, 15–17, 123–25, 401–04. This applies to dates: for example, the war of 1914–18. However, please give the full inclusive dates in the title of your article: for example, the Four-Year Sejm 1788–1792.

Use commas in numerals containing more than three digits to distinguish them from years: 1,914.

 

Dates

Use the style 9 June 1999. Add (OS) if Old Style. Note also ‘55 BC’ but ‘AD 1453’. 

 

Abbreviations

Use a full stop only if the last letter is not the last letter of the word: for example ‘Dr’, ‘St’, ‘vols’, but ‘Co.’, ‘p.’, ‘vol.’. Note also ‘no.’ and ‘nos.’ (both have full stops).

Do not use full stops in the names of institutions, countries, books, journals, academic degrees and so on: for example, USA, CIS, USSR, UN, BBC, KH, PSB, PhD. Use ‘for example’ instead of, e.g., ‘and so on’ instead of etc. and ‘that is’ instead of ‘i.e.’

 

Bibliographies

At the end of an article there must be an alphabetical bibliography. The surname of the author or editor whose surname governs the alphabetical position will precede the forename(s) or initial(s). Do not reverse the normal order for collaborating authors or editors other than the first quoted.

Chadwick, H. Munro, and N. Kershaw Chadwick, The Growth of Literature, 3 vols (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1932–40; repr. 1986)

Cook, Robert F., Baudouin de Sebourc: un poème édifiant?, Olifant, 14 (1989), 115–35

Fuentes, Carlos, Aura, ed. by Peter Standish, Durham Modern Language Series: Hispanic Texts, 1 (Durham: University of Durham, 1986)

Johnson, Thomas H., ed., Emily Dickinson: Selected Letters, 2nd edn (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1985)

Strayer, Joseph R., and others, eds, Dictionary of the Middle Ages, 13 vols (New York: Scribner, 1982–89), vi (1985)

 

Please use the Cyrillic alphabet or transliteration in the bibliographic descriptions of works published in Slavic Cyrillic alphabets.

 

Transliteration

All Cyrillic must be transliterated, except in quoted passages of prose or poetry where a particular point of style is being made. Where the original alphabet is used, an English translation must immediately follow in inverted commas and in parenthesis within the commentary, or as indented text beneath a passage of indented quotation.

When transliterating Cyrillic, please use the table below or our transliteration program, which is based on Scientific transliteration – Transliteration of Cyrillic characters into Latin characters – Slavic and non-Slavic languages (see the transliteration table).

Exception: When transliterating proper names, you may use the most common transliteration in the main text of the article, but in the footnotes and bibliography use the ISO 9:1995 system.

E.g. Viktor Yushchenko (in the main text) – Viktor Juščenko (in footnotes)

Vitaliy Churkin – Vitalij Čurkin

Yuliya Tymoshenko – Julija Tymošenko

When transliterating measures, use the nominative form rather than the genitive, regardless of what the usage of the language in question dictates. For example, десятъ десятин  ten desiatiny; десятъ вёрст = ten versty. This also applies in the Latin alphabet. For example, dziesięć groszy = ten grosze.

 

Table of transliteration

cyrillic

 

 

 

scientific transliteration

Unspecified

language.

Transliteration

Church

Slavonic

Bulgarian

Russian

Belarusian

Ukrainian

Serbian

Macedonian

А

а

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

Б

б

B

B

B

B

B

B

B

B

В

в

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

Г

г

G

G

G

H

H

G

G

G

Ґ

ґ

 

 

 

G

G

 

 

Д

д

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

Ѓ

ѓ

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ǵ

 

Ђ

ђ

 

 

 

 

 

Đ

 

Ğ

Е

е

 

E

E

E

E

E

E

E

Ё

ё

 

 

Ë

Ë

 

 

 

Ë

Є

є

E

 

 

 

Je

 

 

Ê

Ж

ж

Ž

Ž

Ž

Ž

Ž

Ž

Ž

Ž

З

з

Z

Z

Z

Z

Z

Z

Z

Z

Ѕ

ѕ

Dz

 

 

 

 

 

Dz

И

и

I

I

I

 

Y

I

I

I

I

і

I

 

I

I

I

 

 

Ì

Ї

ї

I

 

 

 

Ji

 

 

Ï

Й

й

 

J

J

J

J

 

 

J

Ј

ј

 

 

 

 

 

J

J

К

к

K

K

K

K

K

K

K

K

Л

л

L

L

L

L

L

L

L

L

Љ

љ

 

 

 

 

 

Lj

Lj

М

м

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

Н

н

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

Њ

њ

 

 

 

 

 

Nj

Nj

О

о

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

П

п

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Р

р

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

С

с

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

Т

т

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

Ќ

ќ

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ћ

ћ

Ǵ

 

 

 

 

ć

 

Ć

У

у

 

U

U

U

U

U

U

U

ОУ

оу

U

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ў

ў

 

 

 

Ŭ

 

 

 

Ŭ

Ф

ф

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

Х

х

Ch

H

Ch

Ch

Ch

H

H

H

Ц

ц

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

Ч

ч

Č

Č

Č

Č

Č

Č

Č

Č

Џ

џ

 

 

 

 

 

Ш

ш

Š

Š

Š

Š

Š

Š

Š

Š

Щ

щ

Šč

Št

Šč

 

Šč

 

 

Ŝ

Ъ

ъ

Ъ

Ǎ

ʺ

ʺ

ʺ

 

 

ʺ

Ы

ы

Y

 

Y

Y

Y

 

 

Ě

Ь

ь

Ь

J

ʹ

ʹ

ʹ

 

 

ʹ

Ѣ

ѣ

Ě

 

Ě

Ě

Ě

 

 

Ě

Э

э

 

 

È

È

 

 

 

È

Ю

ю

Ju

Ju

Ju

Ju

Ju

 

 

Û

Я

я

 

Ja

Ja

Ja

Ja

 

 

Â

 ʼ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ѡ

ѡ

O, Ô

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ѧ

ѧ

Ę

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ѩ

ѩ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ѫ

ѫ

Ǫ

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ǎ

Ѭ

ѭ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ѯ

ѯ

Ks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ѱ

ѱ

Ps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ѳ

ѳ

Th

 

F

F

F

 

 

Ѵ

ѵ

 

I

I

I

 

 

Ѥ

ѥ

Je

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ja

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
                   

 

  

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